Monday, September 27, 2010

Outline of Liber CL, Liber CL Vel לענ, A Sandal, De Lege Libellum

Liber CL is easily one of the most beautiful and easy to understand of Crowley's writings. In it he describes the Law of Thelema as emanating in four rays consisting of Light, Love, Life, and Liberty. Each one impacts and strengthens the other as they are the same being of the Law. In a way they can be seen as a new aeonic version of the Christian's three theological virtues of faith, hope, and charity. They believed that these three virtues allowed man to share in God's nature. Thelema declares "the Law is for all" and it's four rays allow man to experience his own nature.

LAW: spring four Rays or Emanations: Light, Life, Love, and Liberty.

"By Light shall ye look upon yourselves, and behold All Things that are in Truth One Thing only, whose name hath been called No Thing for a cause which later shall be declared unto you. But the substance of Light is Life, since without Existence and Energy it were naught. By Life therefore are you made yourselves, eternal and incorruptible, flaming forth as suns, self-created and self-supported, each the sole centre of the Universe.

Now by the Light ye beheld, by Love ye feel. There is an ecstacy of pure Knowledge, and another of pure Love. And this Love is the force that uniteth things diverse, for the contemplation in Light of their Oneness. Know that the Universe is not at rest, but in extreme motion whose sum is Rest. And this understanding that Stability is Change, and Change Stability, that Being is Becoming, and Becoming Being, is the Key to the Golden Palace of this Law.

Lastly, by Liberty is the power to direct your course according to your Will. For the extent of the Universe is without bounds, and ye are free to make your pleasure as ye will, seeing that the diversity of being is infinite also. For this also is the Joy of the Law, that no two stars are alike, and ye must understand also that this Multiplicity is itself Unity, and without it Unity could not be. And this is an hard saying against Reason: ye shall comprehend, when, rising above Reason, which is but a manipulation of the Mind, ye come to pure Knowledge by direct perception of the Truth."



LIBERTY: except ye be free to act, ye cannot act.

"The great bond of all bonds is ignorance. How shall a man be free to act if he know not his own purpose? You must therefore first of all discover which star of all the stars you are, your relation to the other stars about you, and your relation to, and identity with, the Whole."

Discover your will, your purpose in life, then with clarifty and single minded direction pursue it. Light can shine in the darkness but focused into a laser it can cut through steel.

Slavery is freedom. You are already a slave; to a god or a religion, to a societies morals and values, your parents, your family, the herd. Give yourself to your own will rather than outside. As Bob Dylan said, "You gotta serve somebody".

Suggestions:
1. Discard all those gross obvious hindrances to your Will: idleness, foolish friendships, waste employments or enjoyments

2. Find the minimum of daily time which is in good sooth necessary to your natural life. The rest you shall devote to the True Means of your Attainment. And even these necessary hours you shall consecrate to the Great Work, saying consciously always while at these Tasks that you perform them only in order to preserve your body and mind in health for the right application to that sublime and single Object.


LOVE: Love is the enkindling in ecstacy of Two that will to become One.

"Seek ye all therefore constantly to unite yourselves in rapture with each and every thing that is, and that by utmost passion and lust of Union. To this end take chiefly all such things as are naturally repulsive. For what is pleasant is assimilated easily and without ecstacy: it is in the transfiguration of the loathsome and abhorred into The Beloved that the Self is shaken to the root in Love."

Suggestions:
1. Here is the method of Love in Meditation. Let the Aspirant first practice and then discipline himself in the Art of fixing the attention upon any thing whatsoever at will, without permitting the least imaginable distraction.

2. Let him also practice the art of the Analysis of Ideas, and that of refusing to allow the mind its natural reaction to them, pleasant or unpleasant, thus fixing himself in Simplicity and Indifference.


LIFE: the consciousness of continuity given by memory.

"Life then is indestructible as all else is. Yet even as the blood in one pulse-throb of the wrist is not the same blood as that in the next, so individuality is in part destroyed as each life passeth; nay, even with each thought.

What then maketh man, if he dieth and is reborn a changeling with each breath? This: the consciousness of continuity given by memory, the conception of his Self as something whose existence, far from being threatened by these changes, is in verity assured by them. Let then the aspirant to the sacred Wisdom consider his Self no more as one segment of the Serpent, but as the whole. Let him extend his consciousness to regard both birth and death as incidents trivial as systole and diastole of the heart itself, and necessary as they to its function."


Man is not static as the masses believe. Man, as all things are, is always changing. Every moment and every second cells within you die and are reborn. Every new idea, concept, experience changes you ever so slightly. You are not the same being you were only a moment ago. To stop changing and remain the same is the true death.

Suggestions:
1. The first mode is the acquisition of the Magical Memory.

2. The second mode is to dissociate the beings which make up your life. Firstly, you should segregate that Form which is called the Body of Light and set yourself to travel in this Form.


LIGHT: By Light shall ye look upon yourselves, and behold All Things that are in Truth One Thing only, whose name hath been called No Thing

"In this Light naught exists, for It is homogeneous: and therefore have men called it Silence, and Darkness, and Nothing. But in this, as in all other effort to name it, is the root of every falsity and misapprehension, since all words imply some duality. Therefore, though I call it Light, it is not Light, nor absence of Light. Many also have sought to describe it by contradictions, since through transcendent negation of all speech it may by some natures be attained. Also by images and symbols have men striven to express it: but always in vain."


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